Corneal Ulcers

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What Are Corneal Ulcers?

corneal ulcer is a localized infection caused by bacteria or a virus that can arise on the cornea. It can appear as painful sore on the eye’s surface. This can develop into a defect of the cornea that could have a permanent effect on vision. If you have any pain, blurred vision, unusual redness or signs of infection, you should seek treatment immediately.

Corneal Disease 1

Symptoms Of Corneal Ulcers:

  • Watery eyes
  • Acute pain
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Blurry vision
  • The feeling that there’s something in your eye
  • Discharge from the eye

Causes Of Corneal Ulcers:

  • Infection
  • Wearing contact lenses for excessive periods of time
  • Inadequate contact lens sterilization
  • Eye injury
  • Lack of tear production
  • Complications of herpes simplex keratitis, neurotrophic keratitis, chronic blepharitis, conjunctivitis, trachoma, bullous keratopathy and cicatricial pemphigoid
  • Vitamin A deficiency or protein malnutrition
  • Eyelid abnormalities

Diagnosing Corneal Ulcers:

Corneal ulcers are a serious vision-threatening condition and require prompt medical attention. If left unattended, corneal ulcers may penetrate the cornea allowing infection to enter the eyeball, which can cause permanent loss of vision and possible loss of the eye. Your eye doctor can identify corneal ulcers by examining your eyes with magnifying instruments and performing a culture study to identify infection. Your doctor will check your eye, including under your eyelid, to make sure there are no foreign materials present. Depending on the initial exam, fluorescein dye may be used to identify the corneal defects. A test called the Seidel test (painting the wound with dye and observing for leakage) may be performed to uncover possible deeper injuries.

Treatment For Corneal Ulcers:

If treated early, corneal ulcers are usually curable in two to three weeks. They are typically treated with antibiotic eye drops. Sometimes, topical steroids will also be used to decrease the risk of scarring and inflammation.

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